Farm fresh: Can you dig it? Yes, you can!

Fresh berries in Herzogenaurach, Germany

It’s a cliché that one of the best parts of summer is the fresh produce, but it also happens to be true. We had planned to visit a nearby village to get some post-dinner ice cream, but decided to kill some time and amble down a different road.

Dairy cows in Herzogenaurach, Germany

We should have known we were headed for something special when we passed this scene, just a few feet from the car.

As we passed through a small string of tiny villages, we got the sense that we might be in for a treat. And there it was: Rising out of the corn and wheat fields, a clearing with picnic tables, play tractors, hay bales, a small store and acres of produce. The Neidermann farm of pick-your-own produce!

The store was our first stop and it was sensory overload in the most wonderful way. Literally bursting with fresh produce and baked goods, the smell of fresh strawberries permeated the air. Customers were lined up with buckets and containers full of their just-picked choices. We bought some ice cream and sorbet and scouted the area.

strawberry sorbet in Germany

Sorbet made with fresh-picked strawberries? Yes please!

 

Bread and jams at German farm store

Fresh bread and home-made goodness. So hard to choose….

Around back were signs directing you to all the fruits and vegetables that were ready to be picked. The evening we were there the strawberries, lettuces, garlic, mini-cucumbers, radishes, and rhubarb were ready. They even had a chicken coop so you could gather your own fresh eggs!

Pick your own produce in Herzogenaurach Germany

Grab a wheelbarrow and head out to the field!

I expect a mid-summer dance-off between these vegetable divas.

I expect a mid-summer dance-off between these vegetable divas.

Next to the farm store was a park-like area filled with families enjoying picnics and playing games. There was a petting zoo, a fort of stacked hay bales to climb on, a corn crib to play in and open space for soccer and general running around.

playing at the farm stand in Germany

King of the hay-bale castle.

As expected we needed a large box to bring home everything we bought. But in this case, our eyes were not bigger than our stomachs. When it comes to fresh berries and cherries, gluttony is the only option.

Produce from farm store in Herzogenaurach Germany

Our take-home box included berries, cherries, honey, walnut bread, tomatoes and fresh milk.

 

 

 

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Gasthaus gastronomy

The tiny village of Tegau, Germany has a church, a bike trail, a restaurant…and not much else. According to Wikipedia, it has a population of 389—a generous number, I’d say. But we had left the Autobahn on our way to Berlin in search of lunch. And the food gods smiled down on us in abundance.

We got lucky. I don't think it's open every day....

Ready to take a chance on what lies behind the gate.

We were greeted by the proprietress and the token old guy drinking his noon beer. As we struggled to ask for a menu in German, the worry set in. Was the kitchen even open? Was this a dinner-only thing? I think we scared her with our ineptitude. The host scurried into the back and in a moment an English-speaking server appeared. Menus were offered, meals were ordered and smiles exchanged. So far, so good! And the dining room was sunny, warm and quintessentially German, right down to the ridiculous music being piped in. (Selections included a remake of Laura Brannigan’s “Gloria” and hits from the “Grease” soundtrack.)

The dining room was a time capsule, bearing the stamp of dozens of years of serving hungry travelers and locals.

The dining room was a time capsule, bearing the stamp of dozens of years of serving hungry travelers and locals.

Some sweet, and unexpected, mid-century chairs made me love this place even more.

The sweet mid-century chairs made me love this place even more.

And then came the food. Schnitzel can be many things, but any type of meat with breading seemed like a safe bet and easy to share with the 3 year old. It was, in a word, glorious. I fully admit that traditional German food isn’t really my favorite. It can be heavy, greasy and bland-yet-salty. But for some reason, this schnitzel, in this setting, gave us a taste of the German good life. Friendly people, a slower pace, a room unchanged for decades and time to enjoy a delicious meal together.

Flavor! Seasonings! Vegetables! We finally found the German food we've heard about.

Flavor! Seasonings! At least a few green vegetables! We finally found the German food we’ve heard about.

Well done, Germany. Well done.

Altendorf Pumpkin Festival

Altendorf, Germany pumpkin festival

The pumpkin festival was gourd-eous!

We are happily discovering that you can spend most weekends in Germany visiting various festivals and markets and never hit the same town twice. Our first weekend here–tired, jetlagged and still a little fuzzy, we spent Sunday in Altendorf. (Don’t look for it on a standard map. You probably won’t find it.) Their annual Pumpkin Festival–always held on the first Sunday in October–seems like a great way to spend a warm and sunny fall morning without making us think too hard. A co-worker of Ken’s who grew up in the area told us about it–in the best way possible: “You know Stars Hollow? On Gilmore Girls? It’s like that.” SOLD!

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This really, really small town goes all out for all things pumpkin. It seems that every house, barn and building is decorated with pumpkins and gourds. Some painted and decorated, some stacked like autumnal cairns and some just placed on window sills and steps. But everyone participates. The most amazing part of it is that the festival is only for one day. It must be a ton of work to haul out, decorate and place all these pumpkins, but I’m sure there is an awful lot of town pride attached to it.

Decorated pumpkins in Altendorf

It should be noted that apparently pumpkins are blue-eyed when personified.

The area farms and clubs set up food and drink tents and sell all kinds of seasonal delights, from the tasty Federweiser (I think it’s similar to a vino verde, where the wine is sweetish and slightly bubbly) to pumpkin-infused prosecco to soups, sausages and all manner of pastries.

A delicious glass of Federweiser.

A delicious glass of Federweiser.

The pumpkin display that got the most oohs and ahhs was a diorama of decorated gourds meant to look like an undersea adventure. There was Nemo, turtles and crabs, seahorses and schools of fish, all loving created from gourds and hung by fishing wire against an aquarium-like backdrop. Amazing!

Gourds on display in Altendorf

This Enchantment Under the Sea display stole the show!

We couldn’t leave without picking out at least one pumpkin of our own to take home. The challenge was deciding which one!

Selecting a pumpkin in Altendorf

In retrospect, the choice of pants was a mistake. We almost lost him several times.